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Insulin therapy among outpatient department patients of diabetes mellitus in a tertiary care hospital: Do they have adequate knowledge about insulin?


 Department of Community Medicine, AFMC, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Arun Kumar Yadav,
Department of Community Medicine, AFMC, Pune, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/jmms.jmms_113_21

Introduction: Insulin is one of the most effective agents in reducing hyperglycemia when used in appropriate doses. However, insulin may have risks if used inappropriately. Insufficient knowledge of insulin self-injection can result in complication, adverse patient outcomes, and invariably poor glycemic control. Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was conducted among patients with diabetes mellitus attending the outpatient department of the hospital in western Maharashtra. Data on sociodemographic factors and knowledge and attitude with insulin syringes were collected. Results: A total of 93 participated in the study. The mean age of the participant was 55.5 years, and most were male (52, 55.9%). Seventy-five (80.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 71.1–88.1) were having adequate knowledge. Higher education was associated with adequate knowledge. The attitude was adequate in 24 (25.8%, 95% CI: 17.2–35.9) participants. Higher duration of illness of diabetes mellitus was associated with good attitude. Conclusion: The study found that there are gaps in knowledge and attitude for the use of insulin syringes. Opportunistic or one-to-one health education may be taken to improve knowledge and attitude regarding insulin syringes.


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    -  Teli PT
    -  Ekambaram T
    -  Yadav AK
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